What's the most surprising thing you have learned about the piano?

What's the most surprising thing you have learned about the piano?

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  • I think for me, that there are over 10,000 parts in it!!!

     

    :0

    Like 2
    • Dominic Cheli and all 10,000 are MOVING parts! 

      Like 2
    • Glenn
    • Glenn.1
    • 1 mth ago
    • Reported - view

    How difficult it is to play with hands together.

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  • Find out that the key is actually a lever.

    Like 2
    • Lisa Thomas
    • Piano Educator
    • Lisa_Thomas
    • 1 mth ago
    • Reported - view

    About the piano, or about playing piano?  

    Like 4
    • Lisa Thomas Either! :)

      Like 3
    • Sindre Skarelven
    • Pianist, composer and piano teacher
    • Sindre_Skarelven
    • 1 mth ago
    • Reported - view

    I remember being surprised when first learning about knee levers on early pianos, and that there were more ways to control the piano-sound with different stops then there are on modern pianos!    

    Like 1
    • Pauline
    • Pauline
    • 1 mth ago
    • Reported - view

    The inside of the piano has been the most surprising to me! I've learned SO much from your Tonebase LiveStreams! I look forward to the Piano Technician coming on your LiveStream lessons. The anatomy and "physiology" of the piano is extremely fascinating!

    Like 2
    • Pauline
    • Pauline
    • 1 mth ago
    • Reported - view

    I was also surprised to learn that the depth of the keys can vary between pianos.

    Like 2
    • Lisa Thomas
    • Piano Educator
    • Lisa_Thomas
    • 1 mth ago
    • Reported - view

    What I have learned about the piano is that the type of piano directly impacts your rate of progress and the quality of your playing.  As a piano teacher, I have found that Yamaha digital pianos (for example, the Asus series and Clavinovas) are better instruments than they are given credit for in pianist circles, but if you're more than an early-advanced player you'll need to graduate to something else.  The Kawai Concert Artist hybrid pianos are my favorites even above acoustic uprights, and handle fairly advanced repertoire with the needed nuances.  But, most of all, acoustic grand pianos are the best.  I ended up choosing a Yamaha GC2/SH2 grand piano over Kawai, as I have learned I like the warmer sound of the Yamaha.  The "SH2" is a moniker for their silent system, which somehow and through dark magic lets you play the acoustic piano with headphones.  My playing ability has skyrocketed since I purchased the Yamaha last fall.  

    Like 3
      • Denise
      • Educator
      • Denise
      • 1 mth ago
      • Reported - view

      Lisa Thomas I am also a piano teacher. I have a grand (Baldwin L), and upright (Schultze Polleman 126 from when they were still made in Italy 100%), and a digital - a Yamaha Clavinova CSP 150.  I have the kiddos play on all of them, but lessons are always on the grand. Most of my more advanced kids have Yamaha or Kawai uprights, and they started on an acoustic piano, OR the graduated quickly to an acoustical piano. Those who stay on a digital stagnate after a while... in my experience... My tuner hooks up lost pianos that he tunes and unites with students... (pianos that people no longer want... and they are great! they just cant sell because they are older or cosmetically not stunning)... I wish I could get a few to graduate to grand pianos! My most advanced is playing on a Kawai upright at home, and he was crying the other day (he is 12) when he couldn't adjust to the action on the Baldwin... Well, we spent most of the lesson talking about adjusting, and working on touch... and he felt better about it. I had him try the Yamaha (he is playing Mozart Fantasy in D minor), and he did not the touch at all... And then the upright...  Returned to the grand, and he recovered... LOL

      But I fully agree, digital, even quality digitals only serve for so long.

      Like 1
    • rada neal
    • rada_neal
    • 1 mth ago
    • Reported - view

    The first thing that came to mind was how many parts there are in a piano.

    Like 1
    • Denise
    • Educator
    • Denise
    • 1 mth ago
    • Reported - view

    The most surprising thing I have learned about the piano...

     

    Many are called, few are chosen.

     

    And I will keep practicing, in hopes of being chose... 

    Like 2
    • Natale Farrell
    • Piano Teacher
    • Natale_Farrell
    • 1 mth ago
    • Reported - view

    Maybe not the most surprising, but...

    Although I love to play just for myself, I play better when I know I need to perform a piece. 

    Like 1
    • Gail Starr
    • Recently retired MBA (international consumer products/luxury goods/classical music mgt.)
    • Gail_Starr
    • 1 mth ago
    • Reported - view

    The thing that I have found most unusual about studying piano and learning to sight-read chamber music (as a total amateur!)  is how much more quickly I can process mental math.  When I was a kid, I noticed that I could do mental calculations more quickly than my friends who didn't do music. 

     

    I guess it has to do with processing more lines of notes "on the fly"? 

     

    It comes in handy in business meetings!

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    • Anthony Miyake
    • Work with numbers and statistics, but music is my true passion. Piano hobbyist.
    • Anthony_Miyake
    • 1 mth ago
    • Reported - view

    What was surprising to me was how different the modern piano is versus the keyboards/pianos from Bach's, Beethoven's, or even Chopin's time.  But also how relatively unchanged it has remained, especially when compared to recent technology which seems to change every several years now.

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