WEEK 2: Discovering Schubert Month

Dear Pianists,

I hope that your Schubert journeys so far have led you through beautiful phrases and vigorous dances! Below, you can find the Week 2 thread, where you may post your video or audio updates.

Week 1's questions were:

  • Piece you are working on:
  • One passage you are satisfied with:
  • One passage you are not yet satisfied with:

This week, Let's change up the questions! Here are three more for you to consider:

  • How would you describe the character of your piece?
  • What pianistic tools do you use to convey that character?
  • What do you notice about the piece when you play it that you don't when you just listen to it?

Feel free to answer any of this, or last week's, prompts in your responses.

I can't wait to learn about your progress. I love watching your videos and listening to your recordings... I  hope that you also experience satisfaction in your improvement.

What does that satisfaction feel like, for you?

 

If you're new to the Schubert gathering this week, welcome! You may find the guidelines for participation in the Rules and FAQ thread. 

See you in the thread, 🎹

Hilda

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    • Pauline
    • Pauline
    • 4 mths ago
    • Reported - view

    Thank you, Hilda!

    Like 1
    • Anthony Miyake
    • Work with numbers and statistics, but music is my true passion. Piano hobbyist.
    • Anthony_Miyake
    • 4 mths ago
    • Reported - view

    Hi Hilda,

    Again, great topic for this month's challenge.  I'm learning Schubert's Impromptu #2, op 142 (D935) in Ab major for the challenge.

    • How would you describe the character of your piece?

    The words/phrases that come to mind are “dignified”, “solemn” and “suggesting deep reflection.”  It’s written in the key of Ab major which was described by Ernst Pauer as a key signature which is “full of feeling, and replete with dreamy expression.”  I think that fits the piece although the dreaminess is somewhat tinged with a bit of sorrow with the shift into the minor key in the Trio section and overall feel of the piece.

    • What pianistic tools do you use to convey that character?

    To convey the above, I think the dynamics need to be played more subtly than written to maintain the solemn and dignified feeling.  The ffz markings in measures 25 & 27 shouldn’t be played too loudly, for example, as it would disturb the contemplative nature of the piece.  I think a smooth transition from the Allegretto to the Trio section is also needed, so starting the Trio section slowly then gradually speeding up; the Trio section sounds like it can be played rather quickly, but should not feel rushed.  The trill in measure 76 should be played quietly so as to be almost go unnoticed by the listener but should just help with the overall mood.  In the transition from the Trio back to the Allegretto section Schubert writes in a few measures of transition, so that is taken care of in the written music.

    • What do you notice about the piece when you play it that you don't when you just listen to it?

    The most helpful recording for me to listen to was of Daniel Barenboim playing this piece for the memorial service of the late Jacques Chirac.  It was helpful to see that the piece is played well when it is able to convey the mood and generate a moment of quiet reflection in the listeners rather than to draw attention to the player as it should be played with a simple elegance.  So when I play it, I try to focus on the feeling—playing with my heart instead of with my head--which I found to be important when playing it myself.

    Like 1
  • Hello, I didn't see this thread till now, and I am not practicing a new piece, instead, I am reviewing Schubert/Liszt Ständchen. Hope it's not against the rule. 😉 This video was posted in my practice dairy too. I like Schubert's original, of course, but I love Liszt's arrangement of 2nd part cello and 3rd part duet.

    Like 9
    • Heng-Pin Chen Thank you so much for sharing this.  This challenge has inspired me to make  list of everything by Schubert that I want to play to play and this is top of the list!

      Like 1
    • Roy James-Pike You are welcome, and thanks for liking it. This Serenade is really a beautiful piece.

      Like
    • Heng-Pin Chen Beautiful!!

      Like 1
      • Monika Tusnady
      • The Retired French Teacher
      • Monikainfrance
      • 4 mths ago
      • Reported - view

      Heng-Pin Chen Thank you for this lovely rendition. It is a great choice of music, so inward-looking, and you play it beautifully!

      Like 1
    • Monika Tusnady Brother Will Green Thank you! It's definitely a beautiful piece which I would keep coming back to play it.

      Like
    • Heng-Pin Chen I really enjoyed this.  Thank you so much!

      Like 1
    • Chuck DuBose Thank you 😊 

      Like
    • Heng-Pin Chen great piece and really nicely played! 

      Like 1
    • Derek McConville Thank you 🙂

      Like
      • Juan Carlos Olite
      • Philosophy teacher and piano lover
      • Juan_Carlos
      • 4 mths ago
      • Reported - view

      Heng-Pin Chen Beautiful played, thank you for sharing it!

      Like 1
    • Juan Carlos Olite Thank you!

      Like
    • Qingzhi
    • Qingzhi
    • 4 mths ago
    • Reported - view

    D664 sonata in A major. (I am submitting video of 2nd mv, but answers for all 3 movements)

    • How would you describe the character of your piece?

    This piece reminds me of smell of grass, wood, spring wind, youth, romantic love. But Schubert may have said: "There is no such thing as happy music" There is always some sadness here and there.

    • What pianistic tools do you use to convey that character?

    Voicing:  imbedded melodies in inner voice appear often, some are chromatic lines, some are melody, need to bring out. 

    There are quite a lot of small phrases repeated or closely related, sometimes switching in major/minor. and it doesn't always mean major is happy minor is sad, need to give different colours.

    • What do you notice about the piece when you play it that you don't when you just listen to it?

    I notice: it's more difficult than it sounds like🙂

    Like 8
    • Qingzhi Love it!!

      Like
      • Monika Tusnady
      • The Retired French Teacher
      • Monikainfrance
      • 4 mths ago
      • Reported - view

      Qingzhi I really appreciate your playing - the precision and deep thought you put into every phrase. You've learned a lot of much in such a short time, too. Yes! So much of Schubert is SO MUCH more difficult than it sounds. 

      Like
      • Qingzhi
      • Qingzhi
      • 4 mths ago
      • Reported - view

      Monika Tusnady Brother Will Green  Thank you! Yes Monica, it is like playing Mozart!

      Like 1
      • Juan Carlos Olite
      • Philosophy teacher and piano lover
      • Juan_Carlos
      • 4 mths ago
      • Reported - view

      Qingzhi Beautiful playing! Do you know this lecture about Schubert by Christian Zacharias? In one moment, Zacharias talks about the meaning of this movement in Schubert style... (https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=2dWlyLNEWPI), in 32'44''...

      Like
      • Qingzhi
      • Qingzhi
      • 4 mths ago
      • Reported - view

      Juan Carlos Olite I didn't know the lecture! I just watched a bit, sounds interesting. I need to find time to watch whole thing. Thank you for the sharing!

      Like
    • CK
    • br0wn
    • 4 mths ago
    • Reported - view

    Since it’s month of Schubert. I am using this opportunity to learn as much as I could.

    Last week had submitted the valse sentimental Op.50 No.13. As for this week, just learnt and recorded for the Moment Musicals Op.94 No.3. This is the piece which I always wish to learn when I was very young. Not too sure what’s the reason, I always unable to learn the piece for the past decades. Decided to learn this few days ago, and got it done recorded. Knowing that still got lots of improvement especially I felt that the left hand accompaniment not light enough, and having some difficulty for the right hand when reaching the forte part.

    Like 7
    • CK that was absolutely delightful!

      Like 1
    • CK Thank you for reminding me of this piece, which I played many years ago.  It's on my Schubert revival list!

      Like 1
    • CK Bravo!! Beautiful :)

      Like 1
      • CK
      • br0wn
      • 4 mths ago
      • Reported - view

      Susan Rogers thanks a lot. Have a good week ahead. 

      Like
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