Practice Session Posts: Scales Play-Along

In this thread, post a short recording or some responses of something you played  in the scales play-along practice session on April 8, 2022. You can watch the session here after the fact: https://app.tonebase.co/piano/live/player/scales-playalong and post afterwards as well.

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  • Great class! Maybe you could assign a major and minor scale for us to work on, to apply the rhythms and time increases on from class to class, so we will be more prepared to work with you for the next session鈥ike an assignment. 

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      • Hilda HuangTeam
      • Concert Pianist and tonebase Piano Community Lead
      • Hilda
      • 4 mths ago
      • Reported - view

      Chris Deiturriaga Hi Chris, happy to: D Major and G major ( and their respective minor scales, b minor and e minor) would be good to practice. today we started at 120 = quarter and the fastest scale we did (I believe) was 100 for four notes. Vary it up, try a different accent pattern,  rhythmic pattern, dynamic pattern, or articulation pattern, use your imagination! This is for fun and for play to engage your fingers and connect them with your ears.

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    • Hilda Huang This is so exciting! Thank you!

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    • Hilda HuangTeam
    • Concert Pianist and tonebase Piano Community Lead
    • Hilda
    • 4 mths ago
    • Reported - view

    Randi Hi Randi, I just saw your question in the Q&A and am sorry I did not address it. I aim to offer between 35 and 45 minute sessions on the streams. I don't practice scales that much myself, because I practice them in the context of pieces, which I will also do in the future. When I am working on a scale passage, I generally spend between 20-40 minutes on a 15second to 1 minute passage, 40 minutes if it's especially gnarly and irregular. Working up tempo takes time, but luckily, there are many similarities between most scale passages. Also keep in mind that you'll get better achieving what you want to do in your practice over time, so you might get through your list of warmups more quickly, or instead spend your time trying out new things.

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  • Dear Hilda, this is an amazing session, thank you for taking the time and being such an excellent guide. I am a beginner, have started learning to play the piano about four years ago, in ripe middle age, and largely learning by myself for last one year. This play along session with gradually increasing tempo, and all the variations, was so very enjoyable. These workouts will be my coming 2-week practice till your next session. Thank you once again Hilda (from a slightly lost-in-the-woods beginner). 

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  • Just finished watching the session after the fact. Thank you so much, Hilda. Practiced along on a top of my table as it's quite late in the night.  Still, there was so much gleaned from your teaching. I appreciate how you articulate your thoughts. Precise, engaging, and easy to follow. I appreciate the approach you took us through in scale practice. Something I will try during the day on a real keyboard. Thank you!

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  • This session has come at just the right time as we are approaching the Easter weekend, so lots of time for reading the underpinning theory and technical suggestions for this month.  I have changed my practice diary, which has not been uploaded, to focus on this grounding work.  I shall do it later, over the weekend, when I plan to upload a video. 

     

    I did very little in terms of scales and arpeggios on the piano many years ago but I know them well [the right hand], as a flute player.  The gradual learning of scales and arpeggios at the piano over many years did not occur.  I think I am now in the third month of covering all of scales, spread throughout the month, not all of them every day, and the first month of argeppio work.  I will introduce 3rds and the in scales after the current work has settled.  Ditto with 7ths and and diminished chords - probably in around six months' time.   

     

    This is the second week of this month.  I went through all of the scales using traditional fingering from a scale book I have had for decades but I am now following the scales fingering using Penny Roskell's alternative fingerings, where she has one which I shall indicate.  I am trying to do half of each over a fortnight so they are all practised across a month.  This month is mainly easier majors and harder minors (not all).  Scales: majors - D [LH starts on 2 with 4 on the F#], F [LH starts on 3, both 4th fingers on B flat], G, [LH starts on 3, both 4th fingers on F#] , A [LH starts on 2, both 3rd fingers are on C#]  E [trad. fingering], and B flat [I thin this is trad fingering - starts on 3 in the LH and has 4 on the B flat in the RH; minors - C# [both start on 3 - think this is trad.], E flat [LH starts on 2 and 3 in the RH (which is substituted by 2 at the very start), E [starts on 5 in the LH and 3 in the RH, both on 4 for the F# and 2 for the D#], F# [starts on 4 in the LH and 3 (effectively in the RH - trad fingering?], G# [trad. fingering? starts on 3 in both] and B [starts on 4 in the LH and 3 in the RH].

     

    The minors are all harmonic minors.  The melodic minors start (going up) like the harmonic minor, but end (going up) [4, 5, 6, 7] like the major, and are the relative major going down but starting on the minor tonic.  Therefore, I am not practising the melodic minors because the fingerings are covered in the majors and the harmonic minors effectively, albeit that I know them from the flute. 

     

     I'll cover arpeggios in another post!

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    • Roy James-Pike Typo correction... scales in 3rds and 6ths in about six months's time, hopefully!

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